Health

This article was written by Airrosti’s Dr. Denyse Rowland-Jones, DC. She explains the difference between two common causes of wrist pain: carpal tunnel syndrome and pronator teres syndrome.
Too often we assume our hand or arm pain isn’t serious and will eventually go away with rest, but what if your wrist pain is a sign of something else? Here’s how to determine the potential cause of your wrist pain, along with a few tips to prevent and alleviate the pain.

Whether you’re a runner, a cyclist, or just an active person in general, you’ve probably experienced a nagging leg pain that just doesn’t seem to let up. That painful, tightening sensation you think is due to hip or knee problems might be caused by your IT band. The IT band is a thick connective tissue that connects to the hip, thigh muscles, and gluteus muscles. If these muscles are weak and overworked, the IT band will start to feel painful and tight. In some cases the IT band becomes inflamed when overused, developing into Iliotibial Band Syndrome, or ITBS.  

The sciatic nerve is the largest in the nervous system. Its circumference is about the size of your pinky finger, and it’s responsible for connecting the spinal cord to the leg and foot muscles. Any pressure on the sciatic nerve will cause a radiating pain, called sciatica, that can be felt throughout these regions of the lower body. Sciatica itself is a symptom, not a diagnosis, and there are many conditions that can cause sciatic-like pain. Below are some of the most common conditions related to sciatic pain.

Our lifestyles have drastically changed over the years. Today’s jobs are less physically demanding than they were 50 years ago since many workplaces now use technology to increase efficiency and accuracy. Even the activities we do after work often involve less physical activity and more sitting, such as watching tv and playing video games. Unfortunately, these long, seated hours are bad for our health. Most people sit for eight or more hours a day, and the effects of sitting for so long are disastrous to our health. Prolonged sitting causes an increased risk of back pain and cardiovascular disease, among other conditions.

The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that surround and stabilize the shoulder joint. Because your rotator cuffs are so mobile and used so often in everyday life, they can easily suffer from painful conditions and injuries. Below, we outline some of the most common rotator cuff injuries and the steps you can take if you’re experiencing rotator cuff pain.

Whether it’s at the beach or in a pool, swimming can provide solid cardio with amazing benefits. Millions of people in the US every year enjoy swimming, especially in the peak of summer. Not only is it an effective exercise for weight loss, but it’s also a well-established form of physical therapy for those recovering from injuries. Swimming is also the perfect low-impact exercise for people with arthritis or osteoporosis, as the water’s buoyancy takes pressure off the joints. Although swimming offers many health benefits and is often considered the perfect exercise, it can result in shoulder injuries if you dive in carelessly. One of the most common injuries associated with the sport is shoulder tendonitis, also known as Swimmer’s Shoulder. In this article, we’ll give you some helpful tips to fully enjoy the many benefits of swimming, while minimizing the risk of Swimmer’s Shoulder and other shoulder injuries.

Summer is here. That means school is out, and free time is filled with extracurricular activities, trips, and most importantly, family time. Take advantage of the extra time spent together by setting your family on the road to healthy living. Among pressures to eat better and work out more, it’s important to remember that what may be “healthy” for one family isn’t necessarily the same for another. The goal is to simply encourage a more active and health-conscious lifestyle while keeping the focus on having fun.